BIM

4D BIM (Construction Sequencing)

4D BIM, is described as the process of adding an extra layer of scheduling data to a project information model. This data is added to components which will build in detail as the project progresses. This information can be used to obtain accurate programme information and visualizations showing how your project will develop sequentially. With time information federated in the shared information model planners should be able to develop an accurate project programme. With the data linked to the graphical representation of components/systems it becomes easy to understand and query project information and it is also possible to show how construction will develop, sequentially, over time showing how a structure will visually appear at each stage. Working in this way is enormously helpful when it comes to planning work to ensure it is safely, logically and efficiently sequenced. Being able to prototype how assets come together before ground is broken on site allows for feedback at an early stage and avoids wasteful and costly on-site design co-ordination and rework. Showing how projects will be constructed visually is also handy when engaging with stakeholders, giving everyone a clear visual understanding of planned works and what the finished construction will look like with no surprises. Adding sequencing information can be extremely useful, not just in the design phase, but earlier too, allowing for the feasibility of schemes to be assessed from the off. At tender stage this kind of information can allow initial concepts to be explored and communicated to inspire confidence in the team's ability to meet the brief.

5D (Cost)

5D is a five-dimensional way of showing the physical & functional aspects of any project. 5D adds the element of costs to the already existing time management and CDE components of information sharing in construction. The benefits of a costing approach linked to a model include the ability to easily see costs in 3D form, get notifications when changes are made, and the automatic counting of components/systems attached to a project. However, it's not just cost managers who stand to benefit from considering cost as part of your BIM process. Assuming the presence of 4D programme data and a clear understanding of the value of a contract, you can easily track predicted and actual spend over the course of a project. This allows for regular cost reporting and budgeting to ensure efficiencies are realised and the project itself stays within budget tolerances. One of the advantages of extrapolating cost from the information model is the fact that the data can be queried at any time during a project and the information that feeds cost reports is regularly updated. This 'living' cost plan helps teams design to budget and because cost managers are engaged from the start of a project this allows for faster, more accurate reporting of costs at the early stages of a project. Compare this to a traditional approach where a cost manager's report may be updated a few times during the early stages of a project with completed designs only fully costed at the end of the project team's design process.

4D BIM & 5D Cost

We right and define BIM clauses for your RFPs that reflect the goals and uses of BIM to your business. Laying out how project information will be created. Managed, and shared from initial concept onwards insures effective project collaboration.